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[최신 릴리즈] 이곳을 클릭하여 월간 미래학교: 9월호를 확인해 보세요.

아나 베탕쿠르 — 2021.5.14 01:59 PM

The age of the Anthropocene, Chthulucene, Capitalocene or the New Climatic Regime show massive evidence of how human activities have had a significant impact and damage on the biosphere. The rapid urbanisation of the twentieth century and its related extraction of resources have led to an uncontrollable situation with a large impact on the environment and its ability to sustain itself. The ecological footprint of humanity today is the equivalent of almost two times the surface of the Earth.

This means that the area needed to support the world’s population currently by far exceeds the supply of resources and the regenerative capacity of nature. In the last quarter of a century, the global economy has doubled in size and increased consumption has caused the degradation of an estimated 60 per cent of the world's ecosystems. The natural disasters of recent years, the threat of water shortage, rising sea levels, increasing pollution and the dependency on finite natural resources further illustrate the urgency for questioning the current models of urban and rural development.

The ecological crisis is only one of the results of a global systemic crisis: uneven global and local development, increasing inequalities and living conditions, displacement and migration. There is a necessity for a broad understanding of the complex economic, political, social, and environmental forces that influence urban and rural development and transformation today, as well as an urgent need for holistic, interdisciplinary and experimental approaches to address these challenges and opportunities in spatial practices.

This project explores how the global crisis affects local conditions, looking at emerging alternative practices. Utilising Future School as a platform through which to exchange ideas and experiences, host a series of round table discussions, and produce an online archive and interactive cartography of projects focussing on critical pedagogies around ecology, the commons, environmental justice, decolonisation and social engagement. Striving to build the foundations for a common ground of open communication where new networks of collaboration can happen, the project will result in an Atlas of Global and Local Imaginaries.

Programme organisers:
Ana Betancour & Carl-Johan Vesterlund

Team
Ana Betancour, Matthew Butcher, Killian Doherty, Oriana Eliçabe, Ahn Jae Woo, Leonidas Martin, David Ortega Martinez, Mateusz Pozar, Dann Jessen, Han Sung Pil, Heidi Svenningsen-Kajita, David Valldeby, Carl-Johan Vesterlund, Tobias Westerlund

아나 베탕쿠르 — 2021.5.18 01:27 PM
아나 베탕쿠르 — 2021.5.14 01:50 PM

Open roundtable discussions on various themes:

Critical and Transformative Pedagogics
Decolonisation and Anti-racist Education
Radical Practices for Sustainability
Emerging Ecologies
Alternative Artistic Practices for Social Engagement
Ar(c)tivism and Creative Dissent

Online, live, and recorded

Schedule of live events will be announced here.
Recordings of the roundtable discussions will be uploaded during the duration of the Biennale and available here.

아나 베탕쿠르 — 2021.5.18 01:17 PM

PRACTISING RADICALITY FOR A SUSTAINABLE ARCHITECTURE: Ways of Seeing, Ways of Being, Ways of Dreaming…

아나 베탕쿠르 — 지난 달

PRACTISING RADICALITY FOR A SUSTAINABLE ARCHITECTURE:
Ways of Seeing, Ways of Being, Ways of Dreaming…

12:00 (BST/WET) 13:00 (C.E.T) 10th September 2021.
ONLINE via Zoom
Zoom link will be released here on the day of the event.

A round table discussion with Ana Betancour, Sonja Oliveira, Jonathan Mosley, Torsten Schröder as a set of propositions and provocations of how we see, live together, imagine alternative futures for a radical architecture for sustainability. Drawing on multidisciplinary insights, the round table will stretch the possibilities of how we represent, create and dream an architecture that embodies and inhabits complexity and entanglement in all its guises.

아나 베탕쿠르 — 지난 달
아나 베탕쿠르 — 2021.5.14 01:51 PM

Displaying the work of various members of the network and collaborations, the Archive will gradually be built up during the duration of the Biennale with projects, recorded roundtable discussions, films and material looking at emerging alternative practices, focussing on critical pedagogies around ecology, the commons, environmental justice, ar(c)tivism, decolonisation and social engagement.

아나 베탕쿠르 — 2021.5.18 05:06 PM
아나 베탕쿠르 — 2021.5.14 01:52 PM
아나 베탕쿠르 — 2021.5.14 02:32 PM

Becoming like Tɔmbɔndu: upon our collective ruins by Killian Doherty

아나 베탕쿠르 — 13일 전

Key words: Extraction, Ruins, Civics, De-growth, Repair
Locations: Sierra Leone, Liberia, Rwanda and Scotland

아나 베탕쿠르 — 13일 전

Tɔmbɔndu’ communal rice cropping on site of abandoned home, Port Lokko, Sierra Leone (2014) © Killian Doherty

아나 베탕쿠르 — 13일 전

West Lothian shale bing, Scotland, (2012) © Creative Commons

아나 베탕쿠르 — 13일 전

Tɔmbɔndu is a semi-nomadic ritual practiced across West Africa where by abandoned settlements are collectively re-cropped. Grounds beneath unoccupied settlements are highly fertile than surrounding farm land, due to prolonged inhabitation by human activity having enriched soils with fire-ash, animal excreta and the remains of crops and food. Vacant grounds identified by nearby communities are re-purposed into a social and agro-ecological space for community food, that are cultivated and rotated on a five to ten-year cycle, before re-occupation or being made fallow. Tɔmbɔndu sites are mounded accretions that grow outwards with new crops replenishing social activities and soil that in time develop into dense semi-deciduous forests.

Where the long-established West Africa practice of Tɔmbɔndu emerges from human ruins to replenish the landscape with forest, it emerges to reverses generally accepted anthropogenic understandings of de-forestation. This non-western practice social anthropologist James Fairhead notes ‘bluntly reverse (environmental) policy orthodoxy, representing their landscapes as half-filled and filling with forest, not half-emptied and emptying of it.’ (1)

This non-western ritual resists our understanding of the natural and built environment - understandings that are linear and economically structured - whilst restoring environmental and social relations. This dialectic is explored here through design research and studio teachings as replenishing different ruins in Liberia, Rwanda and Scotland by ‘becoming like Tɔmbɔndu’.

(1) Fairhead, James, Melissa Leach, and Dominique Millimouno. 2011. Misreading the African landscape: society and ecology in a forest-savanna mosaic. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

아나 베탕쿠르 — 13일 전

BIO
Killian Doherty is a Lecturer at the Edinburgh School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture who is interested in the relationship between urbanisation and land-based conflict across Sub-Saharan African. A qualified architect design research and practices are conducted through ‘Architectural Field Office’ with the aim of challenging western design knowledge/practices that dominate the socio-natural realties for communities in Sierra Leone, Liberia and Rwanda. Work has been exhibited at the ICA, the Venice Architecture Biennale and appear in Japan Architecture + Urbanism, Architectural Review, MAS Context and VOLUME. Killian is currently completing his PhD by Design at the Bartlett School of Architecture.

아나 베탕쿠르 — 4일 전

Anti-war tourist – spatial & narrative structures in information design by David Valldeby

아나 베탕쿠르 — 13일 전

Key words: Spatial; organization; mapping; cartography; online search
Location: Stockholm, Sweden

아나 베탕쿠르 — 13일 전

War Peace AID Map: A subjective investigation into the use of the words ›war‹, ›peace‹ and ›aid‹, using the internet as the search tool, a new imagery/cartography of the world of representations

아나 베탕쿠르 — 13일 전

If a country speaks a lot about war, is it more violent than a country conducting war but not speaking about it? Could it not be said that the more you speak about something, the more you are affecting how others view that issue? We always have the freedom to interpret and analyse what has been said, but how often do we do that?

In a more complex and rapidly moving media flow, the claim for objectiveness and constructions of an imagery supporting and/or preceding political decisions is the backdrop for my discussions on subjectivity and the construction of a series of ›world‹ maps. War and peace as part of the political rhetoric dominates media and the public realm today. The focus is on the countries conducting war, but is this the correct representation? What if the focus is given to people speaking most about an act? We are shown images and told to believe that they are what they are said to be.

I create world maps that try to highlight and remind us to always question what we are being told. You, the viewer can interpret them as you want. There is no ›absolute‹ truth in them, they are very subjective. As a whole, they still tell us a lot of things. There is a wide space for subjectiveness in truth. Is this area consciously explored and used in media?

This is subjective. There are several reasons you can’t use this data to make any conclusions. Maybe those reasons are the conclusions? Where the subjective becomes precise? We have to ask, where does meaning reside?

Can a subjective investigation into the use of the words ›war‹, ›peace‹ and ›aid‹, using the internet as the search tool, give us a new imagery/cartography of the world of representations?

If the means of communication are subjected to:
• accessibility of technology (clearly under-represented in the southern hemisphere)
• language (where internet in its majority, with a few exceptions, uses roman text encoding) and the diversity of words in various cultures and languages to describe i.e., war, peace and aid
• channels and censorship in the diffusion of information. Could we then argue that representations are clearly part of perpetuating power structures in their construction of ›subjectiveness of truth‹?

아나 베탕쿠르 — 13일 전

BIO
David Valldeby has since 1998 been working across the boundaries of visual communication and architecture, both in Sweden and in the UK. With a Bachelor in Graphic Design and a Master in Architecture he explores how visual communication can evolve spatially. Not in the literal sense of 3d, but how through research and information add another layer to the visual as well to explore and develop how communication occurs based on an architectural knowledge.

아나 베탕쿠르 — 4일 전

Subjectification and Architecture by Jae Woo & Han Sungpil

아나 베탕쿠르 — 13일 전

Key words: Subjectification, artphobia, artphilia, resonance, relevance, art acquisition, Anthropocene, homeplay, Earthphilia
Locations: Seoul and Busan, South Korea

아나 베탕쿠르 — 13일 전

Chaotic Harmony (2012) © Han Sungpil

아나 베탕쿠르 — 13일 전

Danger, Falling Rocks (2012) © Han Sungpil

아나 베탕쿠르 — 13일 전

Lighting Wonderland (2012) ©Han Sungpil

아나 베탕쿠르 — 13일 전

The Blue (2012) © Han Sungpil

아나 베탕쿠르 — 13일 전

One of conventional art education’s most fundamental problems is that it regards art as more of an academic subject than art itself. Therefore, primary and secondary school students generally develop the notion that it is more of something they have to study than to enjoy and appreciate. Differently put, art at school undergoes subjectification, losing its artistic properties in the students’ minds and becoming something a considerable number of students would like to stay away from after finishing a homework assignment or exam. The same can be said about a few other subjects as well, including geography and earth science. You are required to study the names of areas and their geographical/environmental aspects, for the sake of getting good grades on the subjects, lacking a more genuine comprehension on why such academic effort is meaningful and highly relevant to your life.

If an art curriculum’s goal is to help its students with developing a more artistic mind and soul, it should focus more on providing the students with opportunities to naturally blend into it. As for education on the environment, teaching students an array of technical terms on environmental studies and evaluating their scope of the knowledge with merely written tests will not guarantee them with becoming eco-friendlier people. Regular visits to various rural areas, smelling, listening and inhaling the nature can be a more powerful education for eventually reaching the subjects’ telos. This study discusses how a new approach to art education can help both art and the environment.

아나 베탕쿠르 — 13일 전

BIO
Han Sungpil is a visual artist whose comprehensive craft includes photography, video and installations, covering subject matters such as environmental issues, originalities, history and the relation between the real and the represented. His works have been exhibited and reviewed at notable venues and events around the world, including the Ballarat International Foto Biennale, PHotoESPAÑA and Havana Biennial.

BIO
-Ahn Jae Woo is an architecture critic, culture critic, independent curator and former broadcasting personality based in Berlin, Germany and Seoul, South Korea. He was a visiting researcher at the Umeå School of Architecture of Umeå University in 2019, and in 2017 and 2018 a media studies lecturer of the Gyeonggido Office of Education’s Dream University program in South Korea. From 2010 until 2019, he was a resident culture critic at the Korean Broadcasting System (KBS), his nine-year stint at KBS includes hosting the radio show Current Affairs in Focus for seven consecutive seasons.

아나 베탕쿠르 — 4일 전

What is this place / This is the place (WITP/TITP) by Mateusz Pożar

아나 베탕쿠르 — 13일 전

Keywords: geography, mapping, drone, 3D scanning, tracing, forest, nature,
Location: Gothenburg, Sweden

아나 베탕쿠르 — 13일 전

WITP/TITP 3D scan

아나 베탕쿠르 — 13일 전

WITP/TITP is a broad mapping of a place on the outskirts of Gothenburg Sweden. It doesn’t matter that it’s in Gothenburg, but it matters that it’s an actual place. What struck me about this particular spot was that that it reminded me of a stage, with a cliff face acting as a curved backdrop with you as a focal point – this, my first reaction to the place, is the first measurement of it. The scale is ”catch my interest” and the measurement is plotted on a scale which goes from ”ignore” to ”pay attention to” and the instrument – my brain, albeit "real" – is completely phenomenological. Having started there, everything else follows: Man is the measure of all things, and no matter how hard and diligently I work – or convince other people to work – all results are always tainted by this: I stopped here while picking mushroom because I thought the place was pretty, and I wanted to quantify somehow how pretty it is, or go deeper and see what it is. But everything comes back to this: Homo mensura - Protagoras

Let’s measure this place as well as possible. Let’s see which measurements are related to my appreciation of it, and which measurements are there but completely unrelated to my appreciation, or even beyond understanding or appreciation. The perspective is still mine, and in a wider extent, human. I could try to give you a trees perspective on this place, but I can only tell you a statistically probable chain of events – I can’t tell you how it would feel to stand rooted here, having a cliff behind you, and a quick brook close by eroding the dirt from under your roots, one year to the next. In the end – everything we humans do, we do because we want to rationalise our understanding / appreciation / dislike, of something in the world, or we want to learn more about our way of rationalising / thinking. All examinations of the world is a self-examination – to some extent.

So that is what I’m doing here. I’m looking at a place, and ask others to help me look as well, and maybe in the end the place will look back at me and I’ll be able to say something non-banal.

아나 베탕쿠르 — 13일 전

BIO
Mateusz Pożar, born in Poland and raised in Sweden, is a photographer & artists living in Gothenburg. His projects are often concerned with representation and understanding, and he enjoys trying to make sense of the world – be it through biohacking, lockpicking or making images.

아나 베탕쿠르 — 4일 전

Estación Alameda by David Ortega-Martínez

아나 베탕쿠르 — 13일 전

Field studies

아나 베탕쿠르 — 13일 전

Keywords: Urban design, master plan, mobility, mixed use, Transit-Oriented Development.
Location: Toluca, México

아나 베탕쿠르 — 13일 전

Model explorations

아나 베탕쿠르 — 13일 전

Estación Alameda tries to answer two main urban questions: What brings me to a specific place? And how do I get to that place? These two answers must work together to allow the existence of the city. If there is a reason to go, I’ll go there. If there is no way to access the place, I will never arrive, and the place will have no reason to exist. The project comprehends an area with a big potential. Firstly, a future train station that connects the east part of Toluca city, with the rest of its metropolitan area, and mainly with Mexico City. But that connection when arriving to and from the station, becomes a big challenge of accessibility. The station project claims to have it covered, but only from doors to the inside. On the other side, park Alameda 2000, right across the street from the station is also a place with big potential for the benefit of hundreds of thousands of people. It hosts a 190Ha urban park with green areas, lakes, open air sports facilities and the Centro Cultural Mexiquense where two museums, a library, the conservatory of music, the cinematheque coexist. It also comprehends educational institutions: Tec de Monterrey University, and two other schools from the State University. Even though there is plenty of public services and facilities, there is no connectivity (Alameda 2000, Tec de Monterrey and the Centro Cultural Mexiquense are all fenced), is not friendly with pedestrians, the park has a bad reputation of insecurity, and the whole area has grown in a deficient way. Therefore, the project attempts to resolve challenges on local accessibility, urban design, identity and safety.

The initiative is all run by the School of Architecture (EAAD) at Tec de Monterrey led by Arch. David Ortega and C+Lab, the urban department of the university. Local authorities and other stakeholders have shared ideals and principles towards the benefit of the area and have worked together in producing ideas and projects. The work developed by EAAD focuses on imagining the future of the area: housing, retail, public spaces, and infrastructures, all oriented to diversity, integration, and flexibility. The projects have opened discussions in the area with neighbors and local authorities with very interesting results.

The students’ projects go from explorations of the surroundings of the park, safe crossings, and streetscape improvements to mixed-use and housing-for-all buildings in a pilot project called Barrio Tec, a small portion of the whole Master Plan.

The project believes that it is fundamental to change the paradigms of urban development in Mexican cities, to shift the roles of architecture to a more critical and proactive and to bring conscience to the citizens through action and design.

아나 베탕쿠르 — 13일 전

BIO
David Ortega-Martínez is an architect and urban designer from Mexico City. He studied in Belgium, the United States and Sweden. He collaborated in SEDUVI (Urban development and Housing Ministry) in Mexico City, leading the Master Plan for Mexico City and other key metropolitan projects. Together with Alberto Odériz, he won the first prize in the oppta.org competition (Spain/Mexico 2012). From that moment, they decided to establish their own practice called CONSULTORIO URBANO, an urban design studio based in Mexico City and Madrid. He has been guest lecturer at Universidad Iberoamericana, Chalmers University, KTH and Umeå University, Prague University, University of Alicante and Riga University. He has been guest curator and writer for important exhibitions and publications (Domus magazine) regarding urban issues. He is currently a PhD candidate at Universidad Politécnica de Madrid in Advanced Architectural Projects.

아나 베탕쿠르 — 4일 전

Urban Networks of Productive Ecologies by Ana Betancour & Carl-Johan Vesterlund [U+A /Agency]

아나 베탕쿠르 — 3일 전

Keywords: Flooding, urban networks, emerging ecologies, self-sufficiency,
Location: Gothenburg, Sweden

아나 베탕쿠르 — 3일 전

Gothenburg Harbour (2012) © Oriana Eliçabe

아나 베탕쿠르 — 3일 전

Gothenburg Harbour (2012) © Oriana Eliçabe

아나 베탕쿠르 — 3일 전

Urban Networks, Gothenburg © U+A Agency

아나 베탕쿠르 — 3일 전

Urban Networks, aerial view, Gothenburg © U+A Agency with Mathias Holmberg

아나 베탕쿠르 — 3일 전

We have in our practice and teaching over many years developed a trajectory of projects investigated how global issues are affecting local conditions. By mapping, analysing and understanding responses and tactics to the global crisis in a local context, we have explored how local ways to operate could catalyse change within global transformations affecting urban and rural areas today.

As an example of this endeavour here we describe a project on the city of Gothenburg.

We have investigated transient edge conditions of harbour cities in relation to climate change, rising water levels, dynamic water conditions, flooding strategies and shifting economies. Studying the dynamics of the flooding in Gothenburg, we have explored the threats and problems the city and its built environment are exposed to, due to rising water levels. We have explored natural water edge ecologies; the logics and dynamics of ecosystems that are dependent on and profit from flooding and fluctuating water levels, imagining the riverbanks as a potential productive edge and water infrastructure system. How could this system be developed to be integrated in and become part of the city, and contribute to ways of living and working, production and recreation?

In our work and investigations of Gothenburg, a city which has undergone major changes during the past decades, have been focusing on developing alternative future scenarios and identities for the city, departing from its relationship to water. From being a significant harbour and industrial city, then turning into a city with an industry in decline, Gothenburg shows a high rate of unemployment, socio-cultural and racial tensions, a shortage of housing, and is one of the most exposed and threatened cities from rising sea levels and flooding in Sweden. The City Planning Office, in collaboration with property developers and the industry, have developed future plans for Centrala Älvstaden – an urban regeneration project for the region and the city of Gothenburg, branding, densifying and changing the structure and character of large areas of the city through 15,000 new dwellings and 40,000 new work opportunities for the north and south river-banks located in high-risk flooding zones.

Departing from the understanding of the coastal edge as a system, a productive industrial edge and an operative infrastructure, we developed propositions for an urban network – a series of interconnected cross-programmed spaces and architectural interventions – where the flooding water could be considered as a resource for the future of Gothenburg. Based on the model of a network, its physical as well as non-physical organisational pattern is an urban planning strategy in which the relationships and connections between actors, programmes, activities and spaces can be understood as both spatial and programmatic. The network is developed as a flexible series of self-sufficient spaces for fluctuating flows and uses, making it adaptable to future challenges and opportunities. Applying a wider and softer notion of infrastructure or infrastructural ecology, this added layer of intensity, enhancing the production, interaction, exchange and sharing of resources and space, could make it less vulnerable and less dependent on high technology and advanced infrastructure. Programming of spaces and architectural interventions, such as floating markets, biogas parks, waste water gardens, algae farms, and osmotic power plants, have been focusing on self-sufficiency in terms of energy and resources, local production and recycling, commonly shared, owned, used and run by local communities. Imagining Gothenburg as a city on water, where the rising water is considered a productive and common asset rather than a threat, we believe is critical for a sustainable development of the city.

아나 베탕쿠르 — 3일 전

BIO
Ana Betancour is an architect and Professor of Architecture at the UMA School of Architecture, Umeå University, where she was the Head of School (2015-2019). She was previously a professor in Urban Design at Chalmers University of Technology (2007-2014), and Senior Lecturer at KTH School of Architecture, Stockholm (2001-2007), and The Bartlett, UCL, London (1999-2003). Betancour was the Head of Exhibitions and Public Programme at The Museum of Architecture in Stockholm (2007-2009). She founded the A + URL/ Architecture + Urban Research Laboratory (1999-2007), and she co-founded P.H.A.B. Architects (1996-2001). Together with Carl-Johan Vesterlund, she co-founded the Urban + Architecture Agency in 2008.

BIO
Carl-Johan Vesterlund is an architect and Associate Professor in Architecture, Urban Planning and Design at Umeå School of Architecture (UMA) since 2015. Until 2019, he was a member of the Leadership at UMA, the Director of the Architectural Programmes and Master’s programmes, and responsible for the development of the new Master’s Programme in Architecture and Urban Design. Prevously, Vesterlund was Senior Lecturer at the Chalmers School of Architecture, Chalmers University of Technology (2008-2015) and guest teacher at KTH School of Architecture, Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm (2005-2007). Together with Ana Betancour, he co-founded the Urban + Architecture Agency in 2008.

아나 베탕쿠르 — 3일 전

Symposium to celebrate the launch P.E.A.R. Paper for Emerging Architectural Research, Issue 8: Local/Global

아나 베탕쿠르 — 2021.5.14 02:21 PM

Symposium to celebrate the launch P.E.A.R. Paper for Emerging Architectural Research, Issue 8: Global/Local

아나 베탕쿠르 — 2021.5.18 10:47 AM

A community of ongoing projects and collaborations connecting alternative artistic, professional, research, teaching practices, projects and trajectories.

아나 베탕쿠르 — 2021.5.18 11:45 AM
아나 베탕쿠르 — 4일 전
아나 베탕쿠르 — 4일 전
글로컬 상상의 지도

글로컬 상상의 지도

온라인, 워크숍

세계 각지에 산재된 지역 프로젝트들의 지도를 연결하여전 세계적 협업과 소통으로 나아가다

개요

지금 우리가 마주한 전 지구적 생태 위기는 불균등한 개발, 불평등을 심화시키는 생활 조건, 이주와 이민처럼 전지구적 시스템의 위기를 가리키는 여러 지표 가운데 하나에 불과하다. 우리는 개발과 변화에 영향을 미치는 복잡다단한경제ㆍ정치ㆍ사회ㆍ환경적 영향력을 폭넓게 이해할 필요가 있으며, 도시계획 및 건축에 있어서는 그러한 도전과기회를 다룰 전일성과 다원성을 아우르는 실험적인 접근이 시급하다.

이 프로젝트는 새로운 대안적 전략과 실천 및 개방적 계획 모델 등을 살피며, 어떻게 전 지구적인 것이지역적인 것을 형성하는가를 고찰하는 데 목표를 둔다. 특히 탈성장, 전환, 커먼스, 재 지역화, 환경 정의와 같은 개념에 주목하여, 미래학교를 이에 대한 토론의 장으로 활용하며 온라인 아카이브 및 대화형 지도 제작 플랫폼으로서활용한다. 본 워크숍은 협업의 새로운 네트워크가 생성될열린 소통의 공통 지반을 다지는 데 매진하여, 세계 곳곳의지역 프로젝트들을 찾아내어 연결한 온라인 '지도'를 그리는 것으로 마무리된다.

전시 프로그램 참여자

지금/여기

Creamy Polenta, St Erasmo's artichokes, crunchy sage and Doge honey

카를로타 노벨라 — 쿠치나 세미 아쿠아티카 — 18시간 전

On Saturday 25th September the Cucina Semi Aquatica opened its online doors for a lunch and dinner cooking workshop which focused on introducing productive landscapes, existing between land and water, through the medium of food.
We cooked together via Zoom and the recording of this session will be available soon on Future School website.

On the day, we created three simple dishes - one starter, a main and a dessert - inspired by the Venice island of St Erasmo and the Liverpool and Leeds Canal.

The recipes we explores departed and took inspiration from these two very different landscapes, looking at their history and evolution across time. Although the meal featured ingredients which are very much local to these two sites, we invite everyone to recreate the recipes with the ingredients representing territories between land and water which are more local to them.

On this page you can find a list of ingredients - and guidelines on how to find local equivalents - the full cooking process and a list of utensils you might need if you plan to create the three recipes at home.

To share with us your adapted recipes, you can email carlotta@publicworksgroup.net

Thank you!

카를로타 노벨라 — 쿠치나 세미 아쿠아티카 — 18시간 전

Learning from other collaborative practices

Conversation with Rosario Talevi and Tiphaine Abenia about non-formal education, collaborative initiatives in and out of academia. What can education institution can learn about collaborative learning practices?

29th Octobre 15h-17h
Live from Future School in Venice
(link available soon)

조안느 푸젱 — 협업의 아틀리에 — 어제

Learning in Constructlab practice

Presentations from Constructlab members revolving around learnings gathered within projects. What, how and why do we learn ?

28th October 15h-17h
Live from the Future School in Venice

조안느 푸젱 — 협업의 아틀리에 — 어제

Le cours de l'eau, la cour et l'eau ©Juul Prinsen

조안느 푸젱 — 협업의 아틀리에 — 어제

Le cours de l'eau, la cour et l'eau ©Mathilde Gintz

조안느 푸젱 — 협업의 아틀리에 — 어제

BIO
Ana Betancour is an architect and Professor of Architecture at the UMA School of Architecture, Umeå University, where she was the Head of School (2015-2019). She was previously a professor in Urban Design at Chalmers University of Technology (2007-2014), and Senior Lecturer at KTH School of Architecture, Stockholm (2001-2007), and The Bartlett, UCL, London (1999-2003). Betancour was the Head of Exhibitions and Public Programme at The Museum of Architecture in Stockholm (2007-2009). She founded the A + URL/ Architecture + Urban Research Laboratory (1999-2007), and she co-founded P.H.A.B. Architects (1996-2001). Together with Carl-Johan Vesterlund, she co-founded the Urban + Architecture Agency in 2008.

BIO
Carl-Johan Vesterlund is an architect and Associate Professor in Architecture, Urban Planning and Design at Umeå School of Architecture (UMA) since 2015. Until 2019, he was a member of the Leadership at UMA, the Director of the Architectural Programmes and Master’s programmes, and responsible for the development of the new Master’s Programme in Architecture and Urban Design. Prevously, Vesterlund was Senior Lecturer at the Chalmers School of Architecture, Chalmers University of Technology (2008-2015) and guest teacher at KTH School of Architecture, Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm (2005-2007). Together with Ana Betancour, he co-founded the Urban + Architecture Agency in 2008.

아나 베탕쿠르 — 3일 전

We have in our practice and teaching over many years developed a trajectory of projects investigated how global issues are affecting local conditions. By mapping, analysing and understanding responses and tactics to the global crisis in a local context, we have explored how local ways to operate could catalyse change within global transformations affecting urban and rural areas today.

As an example of this endeavour here we describe a project on the city of Gothenburg.

We have investigated transient edge conditions of harbour cities in relation to climate change, rising water levels, dynamic water conditions, flooding strategies and shifting economies. Studying the dynamics of the flooding in Gothenburg, we have explored the threats and problems the city and its built environment are exposed to, due to rising water levels. We have explored natural water edge ecologies; the logics and dynamics of ecosystems that are dependent on and profit from flooding and fluctuating water levels, imagining the riverbanks as a potential productive edge and water infrastructure system. How could this system be developed to be integrated in and become part of the city, and contribute to ways of living and working, production and recreation?

In our work and investigations of Gothenburg, a city which has undergone major changes during the past decades, have been focusing on developing alternative future scenarios and identities for the city, departing from its relationship to water. From being a significant harbour and industrial city, then turning into a city with an industry in decline, Gothenburg shows a high rate of unemployment, socio-cultural and racial tensions, a shortage of housing, and is one of the most exposed and threatened cities from rising sea levels and flooding in Sweden. The City Planning Office, in collaboration with property developers and the industry, have developed future plans for Centrala Älvstaden – an urban regeneration project for the region and the city of Gothenburg, branding, densifying and changing the structure and character of large areas of the city through 15,000 new dwellings and 40,000 new work opportunities for the north and south river-banks located in high-risk flooding zones.

Departing from the understanding of the coastal edge as a system, a productive industrial edge and an operative infrastructure, we developed propositions for an urban network – a series of interconnected cross-programmed spaces and architectural interventions – where the flooding water could be considered as a resource for the future of Gothenburg. Based on the model of a network, its physical as well as non-physical organisational pattern is an urban planning strategy in which the relationships and connections between actors, programmes, activities and spaces can be understood as both spatial and programmatic. The network is developed as a flexible series of self-sufficient spaces for fluctuating flows and uses, making it adaptable to future challenges and opportunities. Applying a wider and softer notion of infrastructure or infrastructural ecology, this added layer of intensity, enhancing the production, interaction, exchange and sharing of resources and space, could make it less vulnerable and less dependent on high technology and advanced infrastructure. Programming of spaces and architectural interventions, such as floating markets, biogas parks, waste water gardens, algae farms, and osmotic power plants, have been focusing on self-sufficiency in terms of energy and resources, local production and recycling, commonly shared, owned, used and run by local communities. Imagining Gothenburg as a city on water, where the rising water is considered a productive and common asset rather than a threat, we believe is critical for a sustainable development of the city.

아나 베탕쿠르 — 3일 전

Urban Networks, aerial view, Gothenburg © U+A Agency with Mathias Holmberg

아나 베탕쿠르 — 3일 전

Urban Networks, Gothenburg © U+A Agency

아나 베탕쿠르 — 3일 전

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